The life of Madame Tussaud

Complete the biography using one word in each space.

Madame Tussaud’s is the most famous museum in the world and every year it attracts more _______________ two and a half million visitors, which makes _______________ one of London’s most popular tourist attractions.

The life of its creator, Madame Tussaud, was extraordinary for a woman in the 19th century. She _______________ born in 1761 in Strasbourg, France. She was called Marie Grosholtz then. Her father was a soldier _______________ died in battle two months before her birth. She spent the first five years of her life in Berne, Swit­zerland, where her mother worked _______________ a housekeeper to a doctor. Then the doctor moved _______________ Paris, and Marie and her mother went with him.

The doctor was an expert in wax modelling and he taught Marie his skill. When she _______________ seventeen, she made two wax models which are still in the exhibition today: one of the French philosopher, Voltaire, and the _______________ of the American statesman, Benjamin Franklin. In 1780 the French court invited her to Versailles to teach art to the sister of the French king, Louis XVI. She worked at Versailles _______________ nine years, until the French Revolution in 1789.

During the French Revolution Marie and her mother spent several years in prison. Then the regime freed them and ordered Marie to make death masks of many of her previous employers who _______________ been guillotined – including Louis XVI and his wife, Marie-Antoinette.

In 1794 the doctor died and Marie inherited his exhibition of wax models. A year later she married a French engineer, François Tussaud. They had three children: a daughter, _______________ died, and two sons. In 1802 she decided to leave France and her husband and tour Britain with her exhibition.

Over the next 33 years she visited all _______________ major towns and cities in Britain and pre­sented her exhibition. It was a resounding success. In 1835, tired of travelling and aged 74, she decided to establish a permanent exhibition in London.

She continued to run the exhibition until her _______________ in 1850, at the age of 89. Her two sons took over the exhibition and in 1884, Madame Tussaud’s moved to _______________ present location in Marylebone Road, London.